Tagged Travel and Vacations

Travel Insurance During Coronavirus Pandemic: What To Know

When the pandemic struck, many travel insurance policies failed to cover Covid-19-related trip interruptions and cancellations, often because they excluded pandemics. But in the intervening months, the travel insurance industry has introduced a spate of new policies covering the disease just as many foreign destinations begin to require them.

“We’ve seen progress in that many plans will now treat Covid like any other unexpected sickness or illness,” said Stan Sandberg, a co-founder of the comparison website Travelinsurance.com. “If you have a trip and travel insurance and came down with Covid-19, which made it impossible to travel, that would fall under cancellation coverage as an unexpected illness that prevents you from traveling.”

Likewise, policies now including Covid-19 would cover holders in the event that a doctor diagnosed them with the virus while traveling under the trip interruption benefit.

Not all travel insurance excluded pandemics when the coronavirus began to spread early this year; Berkshire Hathaway Travel Protection was one exception. But the broader change partially arises from consumer demand, a better understanding of the virus — including mortality rates and hospital costs — and the industry’s eagerness for travel to resume.

“People who are traveling are more conscious of their risks and thinking about protecting themselves and their investment,” said Jeremy Murchland, the president of the travel insurer Seven Corners. The company launched policies that included Covid-19 coverage in June; they now account for more than 80 percent of sales.

But, like all insurance, the devil is in the details when it comes to understanding travel insurance, including what’s covered, destinations where it’s required, and the inevitable caveats, as follows.

How travel insurance covers Covid-19

The new Covid-inclusive insurance generally covers travelers from the day after purchase until their return home. During that period, if you become sick and a doctor determines you cannot travel (because of the virus or another illness), trip cancellation and trip interruption benefits would kick in.

These benefits vary by policy, but a search to insure a $2,000 weeklong trip to Costa Rica in December on Travelinsurance.com turned up a $69.75 Generali Global Assistance Standard policy with Covid-19 benefits that would be triggered if you, your host at your destination, a travel companion or a family member tested positive for the virus.

If this happened before your departure, the policy would cover your prepaid travel expenses. If you or your travel companion contracted Covid-19 during the trip and were diagnosed by a physician, it would reimburse prepaid arrangements, such as lodgings, and cover additional airfare to return home — once a doctor deems it safe to travel — up to $2,500. Should you be required to quarantine and can’t travel, travel delay coverage for lodging, meals and local transportation would pay up to $1,000. The policy also covers medical expenses for up to one year, even after you return home, up to $50,000 — though the policy also states that a holder would have to exhaust their own health insurance benefits before seeking coverage under the travel insurance plan.

Travelers should read these policies carefully to understand the benefits (for example, some rules vary by your state of residence), but brokers like TravelInsurance.com, InsureMyTrip and Squaremouth are making them easier to find through filters, F.A.Q.s and flags.

The new more comprehensive policies don’t necessarily cost more. On a Squaremouth search for insurance for two 40-year-olds on a two-week trip costing $5,000, the site turned up a variety of policies with or without coronavirus exclusions from $130 to $300, with no apparent premium for Covid-19 coverage.

Not every Covid-19-related expense is covered by many of these policies, including tests for the virus that many destinations require before arrival (those may be covered by private insurance).

Many policies include medical evacuation to a nearby facility, but won’t necessarily transport you home. For those concerned about treatment abroad, Medjet, a medical evacuation specialist, now offers Covid-19-related evacuations in the 48 contiguous United States, Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean that will transport you to the hospital of your choice in your home country (trip coverage starts at $99; annual memberships start at $189).

“Covid-19 requires special transport pods to protect the crew and others, which adds logistical issues,” said John Gobbels, the vice president and chief operating officer for Medjet.

In addition to the Medjet plan, travelers would need separate travel insurance with medical benefits to cover treatment costs and trip interruption.

Destination insurance requirements

Travelers aren’t the only ones worried about health. A growing list of countries are mandating medical coverage for Covid-19 as a prerequisite for visiting, often along with other measures like pre-trip virus testing and health screenings for symptoms on arrival.

Many Caribbean islands are among those requiring travel medical insurance, including Turks and Caicos and the Bahamas. St. Maarten requires health insurance coverage and strongly recommends additional travel insurance covering Covid-19.

Farther-flung countries also require policies that cover Covid-19, including French Polynesia and the Maldives.

Some destinations specify the required plan as a way to ensure travelers have the correct coverage and to expedite treatment. Aruba requires visitors to buy its Aruba Visitors Insurance, regardless of any other plans you may have.

“Insurance through a destination typically only covers Covid and infection while you’re there,” said Kasara Barto, a spokeswoman for Squaremouth.com. “If you catch Covid before, they don’t offer cancellation coverage. If you break a leg, the policy may only cover Covid medication. It varies by country.”

Costa Rica also requires insurance that includes an unusual benefit stipulating a policy cover up to $2,000 in expenses for a potential Covid-19 quarantine while in the country.

In response to the new requirement, which Costa Rica announced in October, insurers, including Trawick International, have begun introducing policies that meet the standard.

“It was a pretty quick and nimble reaction,” Mr. Sandberg of TravelInsurance.com said.

Normally, travel insurance varies by factors including the age of the traveler, destination, trip length and cost (most range from 4 to 10 percent of the trip cost). But some destinations are providing it at a flat fee, with most policies spelling out coverage limits and terms for emergency medical services, evacuation and costs associated with quarantines.

Jamaica, which will require insurance, but has not said when the new rule will go into effect, plans to charge $40 for each traveler. The Bahamas will include the insurance in the cost of its Travel Health Visa, an application that requires negative Covid-19 test results, which runs $40 to $60 depending on length of stay (free for children 10 and younger). The Turks and Caicos is offering a policy for $9.80 a day, and Costa Rica’s policies, if purchased locally, cost roughly $10 a day.

Expect this list of destinations to grow. In January, the Spanish region of Andalusia plans to require travel medical insurance and is working on finding a provider to make it easy for travelers to buy it.

Gaps in travel insurance

Policies that cover Covid-19 as a medical event that may cause trip cancellation or disruption, or those that provide coverage for medical treatment and evacuation still don’t necessarily cover travelers who have a change of heart when they learn they will have to quarantine upon arrival, even if they don’t have the virus. Nor are policies necessarily tied to conditions on the ground, like a spike in infections, State Department travel warnings, a government travel ban or the cessation of flights to and from a destination.

For those events, there’s Cancel For Any Reason, or CFAR, an upgrade to plans that generally only returns 50 to 75 percent of your nonrefundable trip costs.

“Prior to the pandemic, we wouldn’t necessarily recommend CFAR because most of travelers’ concerns were covered by standard plans,” Ms. Barto of Squaremouth.com said. “It’s about 40 percent more expensive and we didn’t want travelers to pay for additional coverage.” Now, she added, there’s been a surge in interest in the upgrade, including in 22 percent of policies sold at the site since mid-March.

Industry experts predict some of these outstanding issues may work their way into policies of the future as they adapt to enduring realities, much as they did after 9/11 in covering travelers in case of terrorist events, which was not the norm before.

The pandemic “was unprecedented, but once it happened, the industry has been pretty quick to react and create coverage, and that’s in the spirit of how this industry is trying to define itself, to be one of those subtle but valuable assets,” Mr. Sandberg said. “Once the world opens back up, we expect travel insurance to be much more top of mind with travelers.”


Follow New York Times Travel on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. And sign up for our weekly Travel Dispatch newsletter to receive expert tips on traveling smarter and inspiration for your next vacation.

What You Need to Know Now About Travel Insurance

When the pandemic struck, many travel insurance policies failed to cover Covid-19-related trip interruptions and cancellations, often because they excluded pandemics. But in the intervening months, the travel insurance industry has introduced a spate of new policies covering the disease just as many foreign destinations begin to require them.

“We’ve seen progress in that many plans will now treat Covid like any other unexpected sickness or illness,” said Stan Sandberg, a co-founder of the comparison website Travelinsurance.com. “If you have a trip and travel insurance and came down with Covid-19, which made it impossible to travel, that would fall under cancellation coverage as an unexpected illness that prevents you from traveling.”

Likewise, policies now including Covid-19 would cover holders in the event that a doctor diagnosed them with the virus while traveling under the trip interruption benefit.

Not all travel insurance excluded pandemics when the coronavirus began to spread early this year; Berkshire Hathaway Travel Protection was one exception. But the broader change partially arises from consumer demand, a better understanding of the virus — including mortality rates and hospital costs — and the industry’s eagerness for travel to resume.

“People who are traveling are more conscious of their risks and thinking about protecting themselves and their investment,” said Jeremy Murchland, the president of the travel insurer Seven Corners. The company launched policies that included Covid-19 coverage in June; they now account for more than 80 percent of sales.

But, like all insurance, the devil is in the details when it comes to understanding travel insurance, including what’s covered, destinations where it’s required, and the inevitable caveats, as follows.

How travel insurance covers Covid-19

The new Covid-inclusive insurance generally covers travelers from the day after purchase until their return home. During that period, if you become sick and a doctor determines you cannot travel (because of the virus or another illness), trip cancellation and trip interruption benefits would kick in.

These benefits vary by policy, but a search to insure a $2,000 weeklong trip to Costa Rica in December on Travelinsurance.com turned up a $69.75 Generali Global Assistance Standard policy with Covid-19 benefits that would be triggered if you, your host at your destination, a travel companion or a family member tested positive for the virus.

If this happened before your departure, the policy would cover your prepaid travel expenses. If you or your travel companion contracted Covid-19 during the trip and were diagnosed by a physician, it would reimburse prepaid arrangements, such as lodgings, and cover additional airfare to return home — once a doctor deems it safe to travel — up to $2,500. Should you be required to quarantine and can’t travel, travel delay coverage for lodging, meals and local transportation would pay up to $1,000. The policy also covers medical expenses for up to one year, even after you return home, up to $50,000 — though the policy also states that a holder would have to exhaust their own health insurance benefits before seeking coverage under the travel insurance plan.

Travelers should read these policies carefully to understand the benefits (for example, some rules vary by your state of residence), but brokers like TravelInsurance.com, InsureMyTrip and Squaremouth are making them easier to find through filters, F.A.Q.s and flags.

The new more comprehensive policies don’t necessarily cost more. On a Squaremouth search for insurance for two 40-year-olds on a two-week trip costing $5,000, the site turned up a variety of policies with or without coronavirus exclusions from $130 to $300, with no apparent premium for Covid-19 coverage.

Not every Covid-19-related expense is covered by many of these policies, including tests for the virus that many destinations require before arrival (those may be covered by private insurance).

Many policies include medical evacuation to a nearby facility, but won’t necessarily transport you home. For those concerned about treatment abroad, Medjet, a medical evacuation specialist, now offers Covid-19-related evacuations in the 48 contiguous United States, Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean that will transport you to the hospital of your choice in your home country (trip coverage starts at $99; annual memberships start at $189).

“Covid-19 requires special transport pods to protect the crew and others, which adds logistical issues,” said John Gobbels, the vice president and chief operating officer for Medjet.

In addition to the Medjet plan, travelers would need separate travel insurance with medical benefits to cover treatment costs and trip interruption.

Destination insurance requirements

Travelers aren’t the only ones worried about health. A growing list of countries are mandating medical coverage for Covid-19 as a prerequisite for visiting, often along with other measures like pre-trip virus testing and health screenings for symptoms on arrival.

Many Caribbean islands are among those requiring travel medical insurance, including Turks and Caicos and the Bahamas. St. Maarten requires health insurance coverage and strongly recommends additional travel insurance covering Covid-19.

Farther-flung countries also require policies that cover Covid-19, including French Polynesia and the Maldives.

Some destinations specify the required plan as a way to ensure travelers have the correct coverage and to expedite treatment. Aruba requires visitors to buy its Aruba Visitors Insurance, regardless of any other plans you may have.

“Insurance through a destination typically only covers Covid and infection while you’re there,” said Kasara Barto, a spokeswoman for Squaremouth.com. “If you catch Covid before, they don’t offer cancellation coverage. If you break a leg, the policy may only cover Covid medication. It varies by country.”

Costa Rica also requires insurance that includes an unusual benefit stipulating a policy cover up to $2,000 in expenses for a potential Covid-19 quarantine while in the country.

In response to the new requirement, which Costa Rica announced in October, insurers, including Trawick International, have begun introducing policies that meet the standard.

“It was a pretty quick and nimble reaction,” Mr. Sandberg of TravelInsurance.com said.

Normally, travel insurance varies by factors including the age of the traveler, destination, trip length and cost (most range from 4 to 10 percent of the trip cost). But some destinations are providing it at a flat fee, with most policies spelling out coverage limits and terms for emergency medical services, evacuation and costs associated with quarantines.

Jamaica, which will require insurance, but has not said when the new rule will go into effect, plans to charge $40 for each traveler. The Bahamas will include the insurance in the cost of its Travel Health Visa, an application that requires negative Covid-19 test results, which runs $40 to $60 depending on length of stay (free for children 10 and younger). The Turks and Caicos is offering a policy for $9.80 a day, and Costa Rica’s policies, if purchased locally, cost roughly $10 a day.

Expect this list of destinations to grow. In January, the Spanish region of Andalusia plans to require travel medical insurance and is working on finding a provider to make it easy for travelers to buy it.

Gaps in travel insurance

Policies that cover Covid-19 as a medical event that may cause trip cancellation or disruption, or those that provide coverage for medical treatment and evacuation still don’t necessarily cover travelers who have a change of heart when they learn they will have to quarantine upon arrival, even if they don’t have the virus. Nor are policies necessarily tied to conditions on the ground, like a spike in infections, State Department travel warnings, a government travel ban or the cessation of flights to and from a destination.

For those events, there’s Cancel For Any Reason, or CFAR, an upgrade to plans that generally only returns 50 to 75 percent of your nonrefundable trip costs.

“Prior to the pandemic, we wouldn’t necessarily recommend CFAR because most of travelers’ concerns were covered by standard plans,” Ms. Barto of Squaremouth.com said. “It’s about 40 percent more expensive and we didn’t want travelers to pay for additional coverage.” Now, she added, there’s been a surge in interest in the upgrade, including in 22 percent of policies sold at the site since mid-March.

Industry experts predict some of these outstanding issues may work their way into policies of the future as they adapt to enduring realities, much as they did after 9/11 in covering travelers in case of terrorist events, which was not the norm before.

The pandemic “was unprecedented, but once it happened, the industry has been pretty quick to react and create coverage, and that’s in the spirit of how this industry is trying to define itself, to be one of those subtle but valuable assets,” Mr. Sandberg said. “Once the world opens back up, we expect travel insurance to be much more top of mind with travelers.”


Follow New York Times Travel on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. And sign up for our weekly Travel Dispatch newsletter to receive expert tips on traveling smarter and inspiration for your next vacation.

The ‘Intentional Summer’ Challenge: Go on a Quest

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Credit iStock

Challenge No. 3: Plan a quest — find a hike with a treasure hunt, choose an unusual side trip on a vacation or set out to find something specific.

It’s human nature to find joy in solving problems and get caught up in discovery. That may sound more like what you do at school or work, but research shows that a sense of engagement increases our satisfaction with our leisure time as well.

That kind of engagement can make for a memorable family moment, and it’s at the heart of challenge No. 3 of our Intentional Summer: Plan a quest. We know summer has a tendency to feel as if it’s slipping away, so all summer long, we’re offering research-based ideas for ways to set this season apart from the rest of the year. For this challenge, all you need is a goal, a plan and a sense of determination.

If your weekend lets you get outdoors for any extended period, turn a hike into a quest. I’m the queen of the old, tattered guidebook that assures you “at mile 2.6 of the trail is a small waterfall that invites barefoot paddling,” and my online searches for things like “local kid swimming hole” have led our family down many a back road.

We’ve also tried geocaching, which turns any hike or walk into a scavenger hunt. Download the app at geocaching.com, and it will locate caches near you (usually small hidden boxes with a log book and occasionally small shareable objects), and tell you how recently others have found them. Over two million geocaches have been hidden by people worldwide, and not just in the woods — you can find a geocache almost anywhere, including in Manhattan.

You can customize your quest to meet your family’s interests. If you have a child with a sudden passion for minerals, you might find caves or rock-hunting opportunities nearby.

A love of good food makes for great quest opportunities, especially when traveling — go on a search for the one shop that makes its own chocolates, or seek out a farmers’ market to find a local specialty and make a multisensory memory (even if fresh boiled peanuts, for example, don’t turn out to be a family favorite).

Last week, we suggested playing old-fashioned backyard games. Here’s what we heard:

A reader named Janet reminisced about playing a softball-like game called Scrub when she was in her early teens in Westport Harbor, Mass. “We lived year-round directly by the sea but had a huge yard, shaded, in those days, by giant elm trees.” The game involved a bat on the ground in front of the pitcher’s mound, and the person at bat would roll the ball toward it and set off running to first base.  “I remember those warm summer nights with the sound of the waves and fireflies and my father loving this game along with us,” she wrote.

Alison from Woodbridge, N.J., wrote: “This challenge reminded me of a game we made up in our neighborhood as kids called Jaws. My parents’ porch was the safety of the ship and one kid played Jaws trying to capture us as we ran around the yard. We would compete to see how many times we could circle the house without being caught.”

And a group of teenagers from Phoenixville, Pa., told us about an intentional summer tradition we liked so much, we may borrow it for a future challenge. For now, we’ll just tell you about some of their favorite games: “extreme hopscotch” (extending all the way down the block) and “glowquet” (croquet after dark with glow sticks on the wickets).

Keep on playing!

This week’s challenge: Plan a quest. Tell us about yours, and how it goes, by commenting here or emailing us at wellfamily@nytimes.com before next Tuesday, July 12. Did you find what you were looking for? Discover a new passion? Delight one member of the family while driving another crazy? You can also share on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook (#intentionalsummer).

Be sure to sign up here for the Well Family email so you don’t miss anything.

We’ll share reader stories and post next week’s challenge on Thursday, July 14. The real goal: to savor the summer all season long.

10 Children’s Apps for Summer Road Trips

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Credit iStock

The car is packed, the pets have sitters and the GPS is programmed. But have you properly prepped your children’s devices?

While there are many apps that can keep a child busy, the best are those designed to promote active, engaged, meaningful and social learning, researchers say.

Here are some recent apps for the job. Most work without a Wi-Fi tether, are free or very affordable and are rich in bite-size bits of interaction, making them easy to pass around the car. Platform and price information change frequently, so check your favorite app store for the latest information.

FOR YOUNGER CHILDREN (ages 3 to 7)

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Chomp by Christoph Niemann, Fox and Sheep GmbH ($2.99 on iOS, Android), is a powerful, easy-to-use video creativity experience that combines hand-drawn animations with real-time video. You’ll find your face inside 52 spring-loaded gags that you can try out simply by looking into the camera, and swiping. Pass this app around and give everyone a chance — except the driver.

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HangArt: Play Hangman, Draw Pictures, Tell Stories by Literary Safari ($1.99 on iOS, Android) brings the age-old game of hangman to your road trip, using words straight out of a school reading curriculum. The two-player mode can promote cooperative play.

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Heads Up! Kids by Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment (99 cents with in-app purchases, on iOS and Android) is another fun, social word game that is a simplified version of the Ellen DeGeneres game, in which you hold your device up to your forehead and ask someone else for a clue. The initial download contains six decks of virtual cards on topics like animals; extras cost a dollar each.

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Moonbeeps: Gizmo by Moonbot Studios ($1.99 on iPad, iPhone) turns your tablet into a pretend dashboard full of dials and switches that are perfect for imaginary play, say, for turning your minivan into a submarine.

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Sago Mini Robot Party ($2.99 on iPad, iPhone) contains a set of rubbery robot parts that can be mixed and matched. We like how easy it is to be silly with this app. You can use the sock for a head, for example, or put two heads on the feet and flip the robot upside down.

FOR OLDER CHILDREN (ages 8 and up)

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MSQRD — Live Filters & Face Swap for Video Selfies by Masquerade Technologies (free on iPad, Android) is like sticking your head inside a magical mirror where you can try on some glow-in-the-dark face paint, or do a face swap with the person sitting next to you — and you can post it on Facebook. Keep this one far away from the driver.

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Thinkrolls 2 by Avokiddo ($2.99 on iPad, Android, Kindle) lets you swipe your way through a series of increasingly challenging mazes. This is the second app in the series, and it’s well named because it gently introduces properties of matter and physics. You discover that things do more than “roll.” They can also float, glide and teleport through the 270 levels.

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Stack the States 2 by Freecloud Design ($2.99 on iPad, iPhone) for ages 7 and up is a great app for learning about the United States while you drive through it. The app quizzes you on the capital, shape and location of each state. You can now zoom in for a 3-D view of the details on key cities and landmarks.

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Toca Life: Vacation by Toca Boca ($2.99 on iPad, iPhone) transforms your back seat into a tropical resort, with its own airport, hotel and island. There’s no way to fail with this free-play app, and there’s room for plenty of cooperative play.

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Finding Dory: Just Keep Swimming by Disney ($3.99 on iPad, Android, Kindle) delivers plenty of well-illustrated, slippery fun in this maze game. There are 13 levels, each inspired by the movie, and it’s easy to revisit an already mastered level, so a little brother or sister can have a turn. Make sure children know that they can pause the game at any point.

FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY

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Traveling at night? Turn your vehicle into a rolling planetarium with Star Walk HD ($2.99 for iPad, Android). You’ll be able to predict when and where the moon will come up, or confirm if the bright star is actually Saturn.

Google Maps is a wonderful family resource. You can install a second version on your child’s Android or Apple device, saving on data costs by using the “offline map feature.” As you drive, your child can view the scrolling maps, and help you find landmarks or navigation, dropping pins on favorite places along the way. Show your child how to toggle between satellite, topographic and regular map modes, and use the Street View feature to follow your car.

Finally, Siri loves geography facts. Besides knowing “how many people live in Detroit,” she can tell you current altitude, or where the closest rest area might be. She’ll also have the exact answer, in miles, to that age-old back-seat question, “Are we there yet?”

Airplanes and Babies: Readers Weigh In

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Dr. Perri Klass

Dr. Perri KlassCredit Vivienne Flesher

An article by Dr. Perri Klass about flying with small children, “Fear of Crying: The Problem of Babies and Airplanes,” touched a nerve with Well readers. More than 600 readers weighed in, with responses ranging from compassion to indignation. Here is an edited selection.

Keep Baby at Home

Why don’t they ban children on most flights and assign special flights for those traveling with babies? Airlines should cater to both sides of society — those who don’t mind traveling with babies and those who do. As consumers we should be given a choice and not be castigated for choosing peace and quiet on a flight.

Minnie in Paris

How about a soundproof baby box one can put into the overhead or check at the gate? Really, there is no reason to travel with babies on an airplane unless it is for medical reasons (to get the child medical care not available locally) or moving overseas. Most people travel with children to go on vacation or visit relatives and friends. This can be put off until the children are old enough to behave when traveling. Otherwise, just stay home or go by car. Air travel is annoying enough without self-centered parents making it even more so.

David in Cincinnati

One of the kindest things grandparents can do is to offer to do the flying. Come and visit the baby and family, and if you want to be a superhero, offer to stay a few days and let the parents go off together, even if it’s just to a hotel in town.

BK in Minnesota

Let Babies Be Babies

Actually, I never mind crying babies on an airplane. Babies cry, that’s what they’re supposed to do. And if you want to live in society, you’re going to encounter crying babies. I usually tune it out, and if I can’t, well, that’s one reason for earphones.

lksf

These are mobility-challenged little people, who deserve to travel to see their grandparents. Cut them some slack, for God’s sake. This is life. If you cannot deal with it, stay at home.

Reader in Paris

As the parent of three children, I am amazed at how little a screaming kid bothers me. A loudly crying baby can be two seats over, but as long as the child is not mine, I do not care and will continue with whatever I am doing, including sleep. On the other hand, it seems that adults who have never had children are the ones that react very excessively to the child in vocal agony.

Skeptical in New York

I’ll never forget the flight where my normally lovely toddler screamed bloody murder during the entire descent because she didn’t want to wear her seat belt. For 20 minutes I had to hold her seat belt so she couldn’t unbuckle it while she screamed directly in my ear. No amount of M&Ms, offered stories or soothing words made a difference. And I couldn’t turn on a video or remove the seat belt (oh, those FAA rules!).

She fell asleep from exhaustion just as we landed. I left her asleep until we were the last to exit the plane. As soon as I unbuckled her to pick her up, she promptly kicked me in the face. Ah, the joys of flying with small children.

EB in Minnesota

There Are Worse Things

I’m from England and have traveled back and forth between the U.K. and L.A. for nearly 30 years. I can think of many passengers who are worse than a crying baby. I find that mostly babies cry on takeoff and landing while their ears are adapting to the pressure changes. There are babies who cry more than that, and I can only feel sorry for the parents who not only don’t have a break for the entire time, but suffer all the filthy looks from entitled people who have forgotten that they too were babies once.

Tina Turner Sage in Los Angeles

I look at it this way: I consider myself very fortunate if listening to a crying baby for three hours is the worst inconvenience I face. I can guarantee there are millions of people who would gladly trade places with me.

David Sabbagh in Berkley, MI

A Little Kindness Goes a Long Way

Several years ago, I was traveling with my teenage son with autism. A family with a baby was seated in front of us. The baby was crying inconsolably. My son, who often reports on everything going on around him, said in his loud and matter-of-fact voice: “Mom, that baby is screaming! That mother should do something.” I replied with an equally loud voice so at least two rows of people could hear: “I remember when you were a baby traveling on an airplane, and you were the screaming baby. You were bothering everyone. And people were very understanding and kind to me then. Do you think you can be understanding and kind?” The mother turned around in her seat, tears rolling down her cheeks, with a smile of gratitude.

Jan in Indiana

Running on Vacation

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Jen A. Miller in the mountains of North Carolina in May, 2015.

Jen A. Miller in the mountains of North Carolina in May, 2015.Credit

On the second day of a recent two-week road trip, I woke up at a Holiday Inn off Interstate 95 in Santee, S.C., and drove to a nearby state park. I was in my fifth week of marathon training and needed to complete three miles, so why not do so in a new place I might never see again? I’ve run in many unfamiliar towns and cities — Chicago; Minneapolis; Seattle; San Francisco; St. Pete Beach, Fla.; Freeport, Me.; Rome — and each jaunt has given me a unique look at a part of the world I might have missed otherwise.

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A warning sign at Santee State Park in South Carolina.

A warning sign at Santee State Park in South Carolina.Credit

By mile one, though, a light rain had gotten slightly heavier. By the time I reached a warning sign that read, “Do not approach alligators no matter how big or small. ‘Gators’ can move fast!” the rain had turned heavy and cold, and I thought that perhaps a treadmill would have been the way to go.

Running while traveling can be a challenge. You’re in a different climate, you don’t know where to go and sometimes, as I learned, wild beasts may be thrown into the mix. But with a little planning and an assist or two, running in a fresh location can give you a chance to experience something new.

“Every city has a feel to it,” said Chris Heuisler, head of the RunWestin concierge program at the Westin hotel chain, which, like a number of hotel chains, provides personal guidance to help visitors keep up with their fitness while traveling. One way to get a taste of a city’s feeling is to run there. “There are so many little details to a city that you would not see if you had not gone for a run,” he said.

The biggest hurdle, he said, is knowing where to go. Many hotels and resorts provide online or paper running maps. On a trip to San Francisco, for example, I stayed at a Kimpton hotel that provided a map with different routes through the city, with mileage marked. Free, ad-heavy paper tourism maps are also provided in many hotel lobbies and local tourism offices.

Another way to not get lost: join a group. “You can always hook up with local running clubs,” said Amy Begley, who ran the 10,000 meters for the United States in the 2008 Olympic Games and is a coach for the Atlanta Track Club. That’s how I got a running tour of Asheville, N.C., this spring. Specialty running stores often hold group runs that welcome visitors, too. You can find running clubs through the Road Runners Club of America and specialty running stores through the Independent Running Retailer Association.

If you’re worried you’ll get to your destination and lose your motivation, Mr. Heuisler suggests signing up for a race. “It holds you accountable but also immerses you into that culture,” he said.

In 2012, while training for my first marathon, I needed to do a 15-mile run while at a conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, so I signed up for and ran a half-marathon on Canadian Thanksgiving Day, then ran back to my hotel to complete the needed miles. I saw parts of the city I never would have otherwise — including a bridge I’ve seen used in movies shot in Vancouver — and have a medal with maple leaves on the ribbon as a souvenir.

Whether you are running to train or sightsee, make adjustments in pace and expectations, especially if the environment is very different from what you’re used to, and make do with what’s available. My first speedwork session of my latest cycle of marathon training lined up with the back end of my road trip, which took me to Jekyll Island, Ga. The island does not have a track, which I would have used to mark the start and finish of each sprint session, but it does have 22 miles of paved trails, so I did my 400-meter repeats there instead, using my GPS watch to tell me when to sprint and when to slow down. I also carried a water bottle because, even though it was cold enough that day for two locals to drop out of a planned afternoon kayak trip, the weather was still much warmer and more humid than I was used to in New Jersey.

And there’s nothing wrong with using the treadmill if you need to, Ms. Begley said, especially if you’re coming from a warm climate into a winter freeze. And don’t rely on pictures of a gym on a hotel website either. “Hotels may say they have a gym, but you don’t know what equipment they have,” she said. Call ahead to ask if they have treadmills and if they’re working.

My latest trip ended on a whimper: a 14-hour drive, with the last two hours in the dark through driving rain and the last 10 minutes through a fog so thick I turned on my flashers. When my gas tank warning sign went on just before I reached my hotel in Rehoboth Beach, Del., I thought, “Maybe you shouldn’t do your tempo run tomorrow,” then parked myself at the bar of Dogfish Head Brewing & Eats.

I did end up doing my run, but not in Rehoboth Beach, as originally intended. I slept in, then took the Cape May-Lewes Ferry to Cape May, N.J., a place I’ve visited too many times to count, and did a five-mile hard run through the meadows of West Cape May along Sunset Boulevard, a route I know well.

Then I had a sandwich, a cup of coffee and — finally — went home.

Jen A. Miller is the author of “Running: A Love Story.”

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