Tagged Podcast

Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ Health On The Hill

As the start of the fiscal year draws near — along with pivotal midterm elections — Congress is picking up its pace on legislation. This week alone the Senate passed a comprehensive bill aimed at curbing the opioid epidemic and a nearly final bill to fund the Department of Health and Human Services.

Meanwhile, a bipartisan group of senators unveiled draft legislation aimed at helping patients who receive “surprise” medical bills after inadvertently receiving medical care outside their insurance carrier’s network.

This week’s panelists are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Rebecca Adams of CQ Roll Call, Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times and Joanne Kenen of Politico.

On Sept. 27, the podcast will tape in front of a live audience at the Texas Tribune Festival in Austin, Texas. Details are here. Also on Sept. 27, KHN is hosting a live event to discuss medical overtreatment and its health consequences. More information on that event is here.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • Legislation to combat the opioid epidemic is expected to move through Congress quickly because both Republicans and Democrats are eager to show voters they are addressing what is a nationwide public health crisis.
  • That opioid package won’t provide a solution to one of the most vexing problems of the epidemic: The majority of deaths come from the use of an extremely powerful drug, fentanyl, that is often mixed with illegal opioids.
  • For the first time in years, Congress is likely to pass a bill to fund HHS before the start of the fiscal year on Oct. 1. The bill is known for triggering “culture war” debates, especially on issues dealing with abortion, but lawmakers have largely avoided that this year.
  • Opponents of abortion sought to use the HHS appropriations bill to defund Planned Parenthood. But both Republicans and Democrats worked to stop any poison pills that might have held up the bill. Also, the bill needs 60 votes to pass the Senate, so Democrats had to be accommodated in order to get it through.
  • Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) headed a bipartisan group of senators who unveiled a bill this week that would squelch surprise medical bills that patients get from out-of-network hospitals or doctors, a process known as “balance billing.” The initiative isn’t expected to pass this year, but it is an issue that Cassidy will likely bring up again next year when the new Congress meets.

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health stories of the week they think you should read, too:

Julie Rovner: Politico’s “Obamacare Lawsuit Boosts Democrats in State AG Races,” by Alice Ollstein

Rebecca Adams: The Wall Street Journal’s “Behind Your Rising Health-Care Bills: Secret Hospital Deals That Squelch Competition,” by Anna Wilde Mathews

Joanne Kenen: The New York Times’ “23andMe Said He Would Lose His Mind. Ancestry Said The Opposite. Which Was Right?” by Laura Hercher

Margot Sanger-Katz: The New York Times’ “Manchin Counts on Health Care to Stave Off Republican Tide in West Virginia,” by Trip Gabriel

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.

Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ A Detour On A Smoking Off-Ramp

The Food and Drug Administration declared Wednesday that vaping among teenagers has reached “an epidemic proportion.” The agency told five major e-cigarette manufacturers that they had 60 days to find ways to keep their products away from minors.

“I use the word epidemic with great care,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a Wednesday news release. “E-cigs have become an almost ubiquitous — and dangerous — trend among teens.” Yet, as the panel discusses, health advocates warned that the actions may not be strong enough.

This week’s panelists are Sarah Jane Tribble of Kaiser Health News, Stephanie Armour of The Wall Street Journal, Kimberly Leonard of the Washington Examiner and Rebecca Adams of CQ Roll Call.

They also look at Arkansas’ announcement that more than 4,000 Medicaid enrollees will be suspended for not meeting new work requirements, the Census Bureau’s announcement that the nation’s uninsured rate was unchanged last year, legislation under consideration on Capitol Hill that will affect the Affordable Care Act and efforts to stem the opioid epidemic.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • The FDA’s announcement on e-cigarettes appears to be a turning point on officials’ views of how to handle the issue. It was spurred by reports of dramatic growth in teen vaping. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) recently reported that teen use has increased by 75 percent in the past year.
  • The e-cigarette industry is largely unregulated. Many brands offer a variety of sweet flavors, even though makers of traditional cigarettes are prohibited from doing that.
  • Arkansas’ move to cut adults from the Medicaid expansion program the state rolled out under the ACA is likely to be challenged in court.
  • The Trump administration has been a strong supporter of work requirements in the Medicaid program and Seema Verma, who heads the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, tweeted Wednesday night after the Arkansas announcement that she was excited about the work Arkansas has done to connect beneficiaries to jobs and education.
  • The Census Bureau’s report Wednesday is the first time since the implementation of ACA coverage expansions that the national uninsured rate did not fall.
  • The Republican-led House is expected to vote soon on a package of bills that will remove or postpone more taxes in the ACA, including the penalty for employers who do not offer coverage for workers and a tax on tanning salons. It is doubtful, however, that the measure will get through the Senate this year.

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health stories of the week they think you should read, too:

Sarah Jane Tribble: Bloomberg News’ “The Secret Drug Pricing System Middlemen Use to Rake in Millions,” by Robert Langreth, David Ingold and Jackie Gu

Kimberly Leonard: Harper’s Magazine’s “Can Hospitals Learn to Better Treat Deaf Patients?” by Katie Booth

Rebecca Adams: The New York Times and ProPublica’s “Top Cancer Researcher Fails to Disclose Corporate Financial Ties in Major Research Journals,” by Charles Ornstein and Katie Thomas

Stephanie Armour: The Financial Times’ “Opioid Billionaire Granted Patent for Addiction Treatment,” by David Crow

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.