Tagged Illinois

An Urban Hospital on the Brink Vs. the Officials Sworn to Save It

Illinois and Chicago officials are trying to figure out how to stop a private company from closing a money-losing urban hospital in a poor, underserved Chicago neighborhood.

Trinity Health, a national Catholic tax-exempt chain, wants to close Mercy Hospital and Medical Center on Chicago’s Near South Side by May 31. Last month, in an unusual move, the Illinois Health Facilities & Services Review Board unanimously denied Trinity permission to close the 412-bed facility, which predominantly serves Black and other minority patients on Medicaid.

The board members said they feared the closure would limit access to care for nearly 60,000 South Side residents, forcing them to travel nearly 7 miles to the closest facility with an emergency room, intensive care unit and birthing center. It also would cost the community about 2,000 hospital jobs.

Urban hospitals in low-income areas of Los Angeles, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., and other cities and suburbs face similar financial squeezes. Inner-city facilities like Mercy struggle to survive on lean payment rates from Medicaid and to compete with financially robust hospitals that mostly serve well-paying, privately insured patients.

So far, no one has come up with a politically and financially viable solution for strengthening safety-net health providers in low-income urban communities. “The sad fact is market location is everything,” said Lawton Robert Burns, a professor of health care management at the University of Pennsylvania, who studied the controversial closure of Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia in 2019. “No offense to poor people, but there are economic factors that hospitals can’t control.”

But it is far from clear that a government board can stop a hospital from going out of business. “It’s really difficult in a capitalist country to tell a private company you have to continue to lose money,” said Dr. Linda Rae Murray, a member of the health facilities board and former Trinity Health board member who teaches health policy at the University of Illinois-Chicago.

Trinity, which operates 92 hospitals in 22 states, seems determined to push forward with its plans to close the hospital. It has deep pockets, with $31.9 billion in total assets. It reported revenue of $18.8 billion last year, and a profit of 2.3% in the most recent quarter. Trinity executives told the health facilities board in December that Mercy loses nearly $39 million a year and that they could not find any buyers for the hospital — Chicago’s oldest, chartered in 1852. They also reminded the board that state lawmakers rejected Mercy’s 2019 $1 billion proposal to merge with three other South Side hospitals and build a new hospital facility and several new clinics with $520 million in state aid.

Trinity declined to make anyone available for an interview for this article.

Trinity has said it will try again to get approval to shut Mercy at the facilities review board’s Jan. 26 meeting. It has offered to replace the hospital with a $13 million clinic offering just diagnostic and urgent care — but no primary care physician services. Critics of that proposal say the clinic, while helpful, would not be an adequate replacement for the hospital because it would not provide access to the full range of needed services.

“We can’t have these mega-hospital companies that are getting a property tax exemption for providing charity care closing a safety-net hospital in the middle of a pandemic,” said former Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn, a Democrat who spearheaded a 2013 deal to save Roseland Hospital, another embattled facility on Chicago’s South Side. “I’d tell the Trinity executives, ‘You’re not doing this to Chicago. We’ll work with you to put together a bigger deal.’”

The obvious long-term solution is richer Medicaid funding for safety-net hospitals, effective partnerships between public and private providers and firm commitments by financially strong hospital companies, including academic medical centers, to expand services in low-income communities. For instance, some say state and local officials should prod Trinity to use the resources of its Loyola University Medical Center in west suburban Chicago to bolster Mercy.

Hospitals are required to get a certificate of need for closure from the facilities review board, according to a new state law. But state officials’ actions are limited when seeking to enforce a decision to keep a facility open.

The state could levy a fine of up to $10,000 for not complying with the board’s decision, plus an additional $10,000 a month while the hospital continues to operate. But that’s a trivial amount for a big company like Trinity.

The state also could halt Medicaid and other public payments to Mercy. But that would be counterproductive, hastening the hospital’s demise since nearly half of Mercy’s inpatient revenue and 35% of its outpatient revenue comes from Medicaid, according to state data.

A final source of leverage is in Trinity’s ownership of three other hospitals in the Chicago area: Loyola, Gottlieb Memorial Hospital and MacNeal Hospital. The state could threaten Trinity’s property-tax exemption as a charitable organization. That’s an approach favored by Quinn, who cited a previous legal challenge to the tax-exempt status of the Carle Foundation Hospital in Urbana, Illinois.

No matter what the state does, Trinity can find ways to shut down Mercy. It could argue that even as Mercy is meeting the state requirement to continue to treat patients, it must close critical services like the emergency department or the birthing center because it lacks funding or staff to maintain adequate quality of care, said Juan Morado Jr., a Chicago health care lawyer who formerly served as general counsel for the facilities review board. The new law permits closing only one hospital department every six months.

While the state presses to keep the hospital open, Mercy also could suffer from attrition. When there’s talk of closing a hospital, physicians, nurses and other staffers may start leaving for other jobs. Whether Trinity seeks to refill positions is critical.

“There are things the owner can do to trickle the hospital down to nothing,” said Dr. David Ansell, senior vice president for community health equity at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, who opposes shuttering Mercy. “There is a drip, drip, drip of negativity, and at some point people vote with their feet.”

The Chicago area has been through a similar battle recently. Pipeline Health, a private-equity investment firm, bought Westlake Hospital in suburban Melrose Park and two other local hospitals from hospital chain Tenet Healthcare in 2019. Pipeline quickly announced it was closing Westlake, a 230-bed hospital — even though it had promised the state it would keep it open for at least two years.

That controversial move prompted the Illinois legislature to give the facilities review board new authority to deny permission for future hospital closures, which the board lacked for Westlake.

Yet, the Westlake saga may point to a better solution for Mercy. In early 2020, the state and federal governments renovated the Westlake facility so it could be used as an overflow site for covid-19 patients. It wasn’t needed, but the updates led to strong interest from companies in purchasing and reopening the hospital, particularly for behavioral health inpatient services.

State Rep. Kathleen Willis, a Democrat who co-sponsored the 2019 bill to let the facilities review board say no to hospital closures, said a deal to buy and reopen Westlake likely will be announced within the next few weeks.

Any deal to save Mercy likely will require more money from Trinity, more commitment from other providers to offer a full range of hospital and medical services in the area, and significant increases in state and federal funding.

“Every hospital CEO has to worry about the bottom line of their business,” Ansell said. “But big organizations like Trinity need to come up with a better solution than the wholesale shutdown of an anchor institution that will leave communities bereft.”

Illinois, primer estado en ofrecer cobertura médica a adultos mayores indocumentados

Como jefa de enfermería en uno de los hospitales más concurridos de la red de seguridad de atención médica de Chicago, Raquel Prendkowski ha sido testigo del devastador número de víctimas que COVID-19 ha causado entre los residentes más vulnerables de la ciudad, incluyendo a personas que no tienen seguro médico por su estatus migratorio.

Algunos llegan tan enfermos que van directo a cuidados intensivos. Muchos no sobreviven.

“Vivimos una pesadilla constante”, dijo Prendkowski mientras trataba a pacientes con coronavirus en el Hospital Mount Sinai, fundado a principios del siglo XX para atender a los inmigrantes más pobres. “Ojalá salgamos pronto de esto”.

La enfermera cree que algunas muertes, y mucho sufrimiento, podrían haberse evitado si estas personas hubieran tenido un tratamiento regular para todo tipo de condiciones crónicas —asma, diabetes, enfermedades del corazón— que pueden empeorar COVID-19.

Y ahora se siente esperanzada.

En medio del brote del mortal virus que ha afectado de manera desproporcionada a las comunidades hispanas, Illinois se convirtió recientemente en el primer estado de la nación en extender el seguro médico público a todos los adultos mayores no ciudadanos de bajos ingresos, incluso si son indocumentados.

Defensores de los inmigrantes esperan que inspire a otros estados a hacer lo mismo. De hecho, legisladores demócratas de California están presionando para expandir su Medicaid a todos los inmigrantes indocumentados del estado.

“Hacer esto durante la pandemia muestra nuestro compromiso con la expansión y ampliación del acceso a la atención de salud. Es un gran primer paso”, señaló Graciela Guzmán, directora de campaña de Healthy Illinois, que promueve la cobertura universal en el estado.

Muchos inmigrantes indocumentados sin cobertura de salud no van al médico. Ese fue el caso de Victoria Hernández, una limpiadora de casas de 68 años que vive en West Chicago, Illinois. La mujer, nativa de la Ciudad de México dijo que, cuando no tenía seguro, simplemente no iba al médico.

Soportaba cualquier dolencia hasta que encontró un programa de caridad que la ayudó a  tratar su prediabetes. Dijo que tiene la intención de inscribirse en el nuevo plan estatal una vez que tenga más información.

“Estoy muy agradecida por el nuevo programa”, explicó a través de un traductor que trabaja para DuPage Health Coalition, una organización sin fines de lucro que coordina la atención de caridad para personas sin seguro médico como Hernández en el condado de DuPage, el segundo más poblado del estado. “Sé que ayudará a mucha gente como yo. Sé que tendrá buenos resultados, muy, muy buenos resultados”.

Primero, Healthy Illinois intentó ampliar los beneficios de Medicaid a todos los inmigrantes de bajos ingresos, pero los legisladores decidieron empezar con un programa más pequeño, que cubre a adultos mayores de 65 años o más que son indocumentados, o que han sido residentes permanentes, tienen tarjeta verde, por menos de cinco años (este grupo no califica para seguro de salud auspiciado por el gobierno).

Los participantes deben tener ingresos que estén en o por debajo del nivel de pobreza federal, que es de $12,670 para un individuo o $17,240 para una pareja. Cubre servicios como visitas al hospital y al médico, medicamentos recetados, y atención dental y oftalmológica (aunque no estancias en centros de enfermería), sin costo para el paciente.

La nueva norma continúa la tendencia de expandir la cobertura de salud del gobierno a los inmigrantes sin papeles.

Illinois fue el primer estado que cubrió la salud de niños indocumentados y también los transplantes de órganos. Otros estados y el Distrito de Columbia lo hicieron después.

El año pasado, California fue el primero en ofrecer cobertura pública a los adultos indocumentados, cuando amplió la elegibilidad para su programa Medi-Cal a todos los residentes de bajos ingresos menores de 26 años.

Según la ley federal, las personas indocumentadas generalmente no son elegibles para Medicare, Medicaid que no es de emergencia y el mercado de seguros de salud de la Ley de Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio (ACA). Los estados que ofrecen cobertura a esta población lo hacen usando sólo fondos estatales.

Se estima que en Illinois viven 3,986 adultos mayores indocumentados, según un estudio del Centro Médico de la Universidad de Rush y el grupo de demógrafos de Chicago Rob Paral & Associates; y se espera que el número aumente a 55,144 para 2030. El informe también encontró que el 16% de los inmigrantes de Illinois de 55 años o más viven en la situación de pobreza, en comparación con el 11% de la población nacida en el país.

Dado que la administración saliente de Trump ha promovido duras medidas migratorias, sectores del activismo pro inmigrante temen que haya miedo a inscribirse en el nuevo programa porque podría afectar la capacidad de obtener la residencia o la ciudadanía en el fututo, y trabajan para asegurarles que no lo hará.

Jeffrey McInnes supervisa el acceso de los pacientes en Esperanza Health Centers, uno de los proveedores de atención médica para inmigrantes más grandes de Chicago. McInness dice que el 31% de sus pacientes de 65 años o más no tienen cobertura de salud.(Jeffrey McInnes)

“Illinois cuenta con un legado de ser un estado que acepta al recién llegado y de proteger la privacidad de los inmigrantes”, señaló Andrea Kovach, abogada que trabaja en equidad en la salud en el Shriver Center for Poverty Law en Chicago.

Se espera que la normativa cubra inicialmente de 4,200 a 4,600 inmigrantes mayores, a un costo aproximado de entre $46 millones a $50 millones al año, según John Hoffman, vocero del Departamento de Salud y Servicios Familiares de Illinois.

Algunos representantes estatales republicanos criticaron la expansión de la cobertura, diciendo que era imprudente hacerlo en un momento en que las finanzas de Illinois sufren por la pandemia. En una declaración condenando el presupuesto estatal de este año, el Partido Republicano de Illinois lo denominó “atención de la salud gratuito para los inmigrantes ilegales”.

Pero los defensores de la nueva política sostienen que muchos inmigrantes sin papeles pagan impuestos sin ser elegibles para programas como Medicare y Medicaid, y que gastar por adelantado en cuidados preventivos ahorra dinero, a largo plazo, al reducir el número de personas que esperan para buscar tratamiento hasta que es una emergencia.

Algunos inmigrantes indocumentados temen que inscribirse para tener seguro de salud ponga en peligro su capacidad para obtener la residencia o la ciudadanía. Andrea Kovach, abogada senior de equidad en atención de salud en el Shriver Center on Poverty Law en Chicago, dice que no deben preocuparse. “Illinois tiene el legado de ser un estado que acoge a inmigrantes y protege su privacidad”, dijo.(Andrea Kovach)

Para Delia Ramírez, representante estatal de Illinois, ampliar la cobertura de salud a todos los adultos mayores de bajos ingresos es personal. A la demócrata de Chicago la inspira su tío, un inmigrante de 64 años que no tiene seguro.

Dijo que intentó que la legislación cubriera a las personas de 55 años o más, ya que la gran mayoría de los indocumentados no son personas mayores (señaló que muchos de los inmigrantes mayores —2,7 millones, según estimaciones del gobierno— obtuvieron el estatus legal con la ley de amnistía federal de 1986).

Un mayor número de inmigrantes más jóvenes también pueden estar sin seguro. En los Centros de Salud Esperanza, uno de los mayores proveedores de atención médica para inmigrantes de Chicago, el 31% de los pacientes de 65 años o más carece de cobertura, en comparación con el 47% de los de 60 a 64 años, según Jeffey McInnes, que supervisa el acceso de los pacientes a las clínicas.

Ramírez dijo que su tío la llamó después de ver las noticias sobre la nueva legislación en la televisión en español. Contó que su tío ha vivido en el país por cuatro décadas y ha trabajado para que sus cuatro hijos fueran a la universidad. También padece asma, diabetes e hipertensión, lo que lo hace de alto riesgo para COVID-19.

“Yo le dije: ‘Tío, todavía no. Pero cuando cumplas 65 años, finalmente tendrás atención médica, si es que aún no hemos conseguido legalizarte”, recordó Ramírez, emocionada, durante una reciente entrevista telefónica.

“Así que es un recordatorio para mí de que, en primer lugar, fue una gran victoria para nosotros y ha significado la vida o una segunda oportunidad de vida para muchas personas”, dijo. “Pero también significa que todavía tenemos un largo camino por recorrer para hacer de la atención de salud un verdadero derecho humano en el estado, y en la nación”.

Related Topics

Global Health Watch Insurance Medicaid Medicare Noticias En Español Race and Health Uninsured