Tagged Health Industry

Tennessee Reveals $7.9B Plan To Shift Medicaid Into Controversial Block Grant System

The plan’s likelihood of ever being implemented, however, remains largely unknown. To date, no state has been given permission to rely solely on block grants to cover Medicaid expenses. Gov. Bill Lee, however, remains hopeful, pointing to the fact that the Trump administration has been encouraging states to take more control of their programs.

Judge Sides With Hospitals Over Medicare Payments For Clinic Visits

U.S. District Judge Rosemary Collyer said in her ruling that the Trump administration overstepped its authority when issuing its so-called site-neutral pay policy. The decision is a big win for hospitals, who in their original complaint led by the American Hospital Association projected cuts of about $380 million this year and $760 million in 2020. In other CMS news: skilled-nursing facilities and bundled radiation therapy payments.

Normally Cautious AARP Goes On The Offensive With Aggressive ‘Strike Force’ In War Over High Drug Prices

Back in March, the organization has kicked-off a multi-million dollar campaign against the pharmaceutical industry. Since then they’ve stormed lawmakers’ offices, ramped up their ad campaigns, and even rented planes to fly over beaches. “I can’t really think of another time when there’s been this strong a message in opposition to an entire industry,” said John Rother, the group’s former head of policy.

Nearly 200 Servers That Store Americans’ Medical Records Are So Insecure Anyone With A Few Lines Of Code Can See Data

Medical records have become a hot target for hackers looking for troves of data. ProPublica launched an investigation into just how easy the servers are to breach. Meanwhile, a San Diego couple is being charge with stealing trade secrets allegedly to use the information to market their biotech company.

Advocates For Low-Wage Immigrants Are Latest To File Suit Against Trump Administration’s ‘Public Charge’ Rule

The “public charge” rule makes it more likely that a legal immigrant who uses benefits such as Medicaid, food stamps and housing assistance will be identified as a “public charge,” jeopardizing their potential to get a green card and become a U.S. citizen. The Trump administration policy has already drawn legal challenges from nearly 20 states.

Longtime Crusader Against OxyContin Begins To See The Fruits Of Her Struggle

In the 15 years since she lost her son to a single OxyContin pill, Barbara Van Rooyan has had but one up-close look at the people representing the company that made it.

It was in a small courthouse in Abingdon, Va., where Van Rooyan and other relatives of OxyContin victims gathered for a sentencing hearing in 2007. Three executives of Purdue Pharma had pleaded guilty to federal charges related to their misbranding and marketing of the powerful opioid. The company had pleaded guilty as well.

Van Rooyan and the others in her group spoke during the sentencing, giving voice to their grief and their pain. They wanted the executives sent to jail for knowingly expanding an opioid crisis fast engulfing the country.

Instead, Purdue paid fines totaling $634 million. The executives served no time. The company was allowed to continue aggressively marketing its product, and the following year, sales of OxyContin reached $2 billion.

From 1999 to 2017, more than 700,000 people in the U.S. died of drug overdoses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2017, nearly 68% of the more than 70,000 recorded overdose deaths involved opioids.

“I never really thought a whole lot about evil before this all happened,” Van Rooyan said recently, seated on a couch in the living room of her Irvine, Calif., home. “But to see this kind of malevolence or disregard for human life — I don’t know what else to call it but evil.”

The outcome in that Virginia courthouse was a far cry from last week’s news of a tentative mass settlement of many of the 2,000-plus lawsuits against the company, which could total upward of $12 billion and result in Purdue’s dissolution.

The potential settlement amount would include $3 billion from the Sackler family, owners of Purdue, whose fortune is estimated at $13 billion. The family has amassed that money over the past two decades, largely by selling OxyContin, an opioid painkiller.

Van Rooyan’s Purdue experience is a story of deception, sadness and frustration — yet when she tells it now, she emits a surprising spark of energy. That’s because Van Rooyan, part of the unlikely group of citizens who repeatedly took flailing swings at Purdue Pharma, is watching the giant fall.

Van Rooyan, who has studied the cases against Purdue closely, sees the paradox in the proffered settlement: Much of the payout would be financed by profits from the continued sale of OxyContin, under a new company that would be formed following a Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

Van Rooyan says she treasures this photo of herself holding son Patrick shortly after he was born.  (Ana Venegas for KHN)

But in some regard, she said, Purdue Pharma’s complicity in the opioid crisis has finally emerged into the general public’s view. “The world really knows now. They get it,” she said. “The lid is off, and all this stuff is bubbling out.”

That wasn’t the case on the night of July 4, 2004, when Van Rooyan and her husband, Kirk, got the call that changed their world. Barbara, then a professor of counseling at Folsom Lake College near Sacramento, was told that her son, Patrick Stewart, lay in a San Diego hospital, in a medically induced coma from which he was unlikely to emerge.

Patrick, a graduate of Oak Ridge High School in El Dorado Hills, Calif., and San Diego State University, died at age 24. His friends told Barbara they had attended an Independence Day party at which someone offered her son an OxyContin pill, telling him it “was kind of like a muscle relaxant and it was FDA approved, so it was safe,” she said. Patrick, who had also consumed a couple of beers, was opioid intolerant and suffered respiratory failure in his sleep.

“At the time,” Van Rooyan said, “all I knew about Oxy was that Rush Limbaugh had been addicted to it.”

She was about to learn a lot more.

Van Rooyan channeled her grief through intense research into Oxy’s vast potential for damage despite the company’s sales pitches to the contrary. A slow-release pain treatment with a heavy dose of the narcotic oxycodone, it could be easily crushed or dissolved for a more intense and addictive high. Rampant abuse already had begun to be reported, particularly in the Appalachian area, author Beth Macy wrote in her national bestseller “Dopesick.”

Later in 2004, Van Rooyan found Ed Bisch, a Philadelphia man who had begun a website to expose Oxy abuse in the wake of his teenage son’s death. The following year, Van Rooyan and her husband, a plastic surgeon, petitioned the Food and Drug Administration to require that OxyContin be made more abuse-resistant, and that its use be strictly limited to severe pain.

“This was an exhausting process, which she and Kirk did as a labor of love to try to save others,” Bisch recalled.

Van Rooyan became the California arm of a grassroots movement known as RAPP — Relatives Against Purdue Pharma. The group, originally just four in number, protested at physician meetings funded by pharmaceutical companies and testified before Congress. Van Rooyan enlisted the help of U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), who wrote the FDA on her behalf and later sent Van Rooyan a letter of commendation.

In the 15 years since she lost her son, Van Rooyan has since channeled her grief into intense research about Oxy’s vast potential for damage and has become one of the trailblazers of the anti-OxyContin movement.  (Ana Venegas for KHN)

But most members of Congress did not reply to Van Rooyan’s letters, she said. The FDA said its review needed more time — which turned out to be eight years. By then, Purdue already had reformulated OxyContin to make it more abuse resistant and to renew its patent, but the FDA declined to restrict its use to managing severe pain.

Van Rooyan pressed on, but for a long while, the opioid crisis felt to her like a topic hiding in plain sight. And fighting Purdue while still grieving the loss of son Patrick was taking a toll.

“Her determination was tireless,” Bisch said, “but eventually the frustration burned us out.”

And then came the turn.

A rash of high-profile opioid overdoses and deaths, from actor Heath Ledger to Tom Petty to Prince, put the topic squarely in the public eye — and 15 years after the death of Van Rooyan’s son, Purdue Pharma and other drugmakers were suddenly on the run.

Van Rooyan tracks every development related to Purdue, including a lawsuit in New York that alleges members of the Sackler family have been offloading their fortunes into private or offshore accounts to shield them from a settlement.

But she’s not out for vengeance. Her goals have changed.

“Do I want the records to be public? Do I want these people to have their business shut down? Yes, I do,” she said. “But more than vindictiveness, I want that money of theirs to go to treatment and rehab. If that happens, something good can come out of it.”

Van Rooyan touches a painting she co-created with artist Nick Simon in memory of Patrick. She says art is part of what saved her in the aftermath of her son’s death.  (Ana Venegas for KHN)

If she has a regret, it is that the case in Virginia ended in 2007 with no more than a fine. “If that result had been different — if people had gone to jail — it could have changed the trajectory of this,” she said.

But momentum finally appears to be gathering, and Van Rooyan finds herself identified as one of the trailblazers of the anti-OxyContin movement. She spends little time dwelling on that. Instead, she quotes her younger son, Andrew, who told her, “We didn’t want any of this — this is just the hand we were dealt. We need to play the cards the best we can.”

“She’s just a really strong person,” said Kirk Van Rooyan, who has been with Barbara throughout the ordeal, though he is not Patrick’s biological father. “There have been times when I’d think to myself, ‘How would I be doing if I were in her shoes?’ And the answer usually is, ‘Not as well as she’s doing.’”

Van Rooyan, a longtime artist, now spends much of her time volunteering with veterans in Orange County, Calif., helping them get back into the workforce and using art therapy to help them express themselves.

The art is special to Van Rooyan, she said, because it is part of what saved her in the aftermath of her son’s death.

“Patrick was the one who suggested I take my first class,” she said. After a few delays, she finally enrolled. It was about a month before that Fourth of July in 2004.


This KHN story first published on California Healthline, a service of the California Health Care Foundation.

Panel Recommends FDA Approve First-Ever Peanut-Allergy Drug That Could Reduce Risk Of Fatal Reactions

While peanut allergies are the leading cause of death from food-induced allergic reactions in the country, a lack of approved preventive treatments has left families desperate for some kind of hope. The drug’s goal is not to cure the allergy, but to reduce the risk that an accidental exposure to small amounts of peanut.

Discord Increases Over Severance Package, Confidentiality Clause Between Planned Parenthood And Fired President Leana Wen

“They want to silence my voice as a public health expert,” said Dr. Leana Wan. “I simply will not sign away my right to speak my mind. I won’t compromise my integrity.” Planned Parenthood disputed her charges. News on women’s health also reports on medication abortions and fetal remains.

Air Ambulances Woo Rural Consumers With Memberships That May Leave Them Hanging

FORT SCOTT, Kan. — On a hot June day as the Good Ol’ Days festival was in full swing, 7-year-old Kaidence Anderson sat in the shade with her family, waiting for a medevac helicopter to land.

A crowd had gathered to see the display prearranged by staff at the town’s historic fort.

“It’s going to show us how it’s going to help other people because we don’t have the hospital anymore,” the redheaded girl explained.

Mercy Hospital Fort Scott closed at the end of 2018, leaving this rural community about 90 miles south of Kansas City without a traditional hospital. The community has outpatient clinics run by a regional nonprofit health center and — at least temporarily — an emergency department operated as a satellite of a hospital in the next town over.

Since the hospital closed, air ambulance advertising has become a more common sight in mailboxes and at least one company’s representative has paid visits to a local nursing home and the Chamber of Commerce, offering memberships. A prepaid subscription would guarantee that if an AirMedCare Network helicopter comes to your rescue, you will pay nothing.

Nationwide, though, state insurance leaders, politicians and even one of the nation’s largest air ambulance companies have raised alarms about the slickly marketed membership campaigns.

The air ambulance industry expanded by more than a hundred bases nationwide from 2012 to 2017 and prices increased as well, according to a recent federal report. The median price charged for a medevac helicopter transport was $36,400 in 2017 — a 60% increase compared with the roughly $22,100 charged in 2012, according to the March report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office.

Insurance seldom covers the trips and consumers often are surprised to get a bill showing they are responsible for the bulk of the cost. However, both Medicare and Medicaid control the price of the service, so enrollees in those government insurance programs face much lower out-of-pocket costs or have none.

AirMedCare Network, which includes 340 bases across mostly rural America, has more than 3 million people enrolled in memberships, said Seth Myers, president of Air Evac Lifeteam, one of the medevac companies under the AirMedCare Network umbrella.

One brightly colored AirMedCare advertisement mailed in southeastern Kansas promised entry in a summer vacation giveaway as an incentive to sign up. A one-year membership is $85 — unless you are 60 or older, which qualifies you for a discount. Buying multiyear memberships increases the odds of winning that summer trip.

“We’re a safety net for people in rural areas,” Myers said. “Generally, if I tell you the names of the towns that most of our bases are located in, you wouldn’t know them unless you lived in that state.”

Increasingly, though, state regulators have a skeptical view.

North Dakota Insurance Commissioner Jon Godfread called the memberships “another loophole” that air ambulance companies use to “essentially exploit our consumers.” The state banned the memberships in 2017, noting that the subscription plans don’t solve the problem of surprise medical bills as promised.

Too often, the company responding to a patient’s call for help is not the one the patient signed up with, Godfread said. North Dakota has nine different air ambulance operators who respond to calls and patients have no control over who will be called, he explained.

Air Evac’s Myers said his company, which operates mostly in the Midwest and Texas, doesn’t get many complaints from customers about other companies picking them up. He counted three this year.

Texas Rep. Drew Springer, a Republican, introduced a bill passed by the state legislature this year that would require companies to honor the subscriptions or memberships of other air ambulance companies.

But Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, also a Republican, vetoed Springer’s reciprocity bill, saying it would unnecessarily intrude on the operations of private businesses.

Myers said that AirMedCare Network was “very careful to educate the legislature and the governor’s office” in Texas. A letter signed by Myers and other industry executives noted that the 1978 Airline Deregulation Act — a law created for the commercial airline industry — protects them. The federal law limits states’ ability to regulate rates, routes or services. The law is at the core of the industry’s defense of its prices.

Like North Dakota, though, Montana used insurance regulations to limit the memberships. A 2017 law requires air ambulance subscriptions to be certified by the state’s insurance department. As of August, no company had applied for certification — essentially opting out of the state.

Air Methods, one of the nation’s largest private air ambulance companies, decided memberships “aren’t right for patients,” according to Megan Smith, a spokeswoman for the company.

While membership programs promise customers will avoid out-of-pocket expenses, in reality the contractual fine print “isn’t as cut and dry,” she said in an email.

Patients who sign up for memberships and have private insurance would still receive a bill and then must work through their insurance company’s claims, denial and appeal processes.

And while Air Evac’s Myers said the AirMedCare Network memberships or subscription fees replace copays and deductibles, Air Method’s email highlighted in bold print that “a membership is not necessary” for Medicare patients because federal law prohibits companies from charging more than copays and deductibles. Myers said having a membership offers peace of mind, particularly to those Medicare enrollees who do not have an added supplemental insurance plan that covers transportation.

Also, because the memberships are not officially insurance or a covered benefit, air ambulance companies can end them at any time “without obligation to notify the customer,” stated the Air Methods email. This means a patient could believe his or her emergency air transport was taken care of, only to face a rude awakening when the bill came.

Air Methods is the preferred helicopter service for Fort Scott’s dispatch service, according to city officials. Yet, Midwest AeroCare operated the helicopter that dropped in during the Good Ol’ Days festival.

Pilot Michael Samuelson has been flying for three decades, which, he jokes, is “why I got all the gray hair.” The Midwest AeroCare helicopter behind him flies about 130 mph and takes about 40 minutes to transport a patient the roughly 90 miles from Fort Scott, Kan., to the Kansas City metro area. “It’s pretty fast,” Samuelson says.(Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN)

Midwest AeroCare is part of the AirMedCare Network — not Air Methods. Families like the Andersons were there looking for reassurance that someone would come for them if needed, said Dawn Swisher-Anderson, Kaidence’s mom. Her son, Connor, has frequent and severe asthma attacks that require hospitalization.

“It’s obviously scary with a young one when he’s having breathing complications,” Swisher-Anderson said.

Once the helicopter landed, a tall pilot and two crewmembers stepped out and the onlookers quickly formed a line on the grass. Susan Glossip, who brought her grandchildren to see the helicopter, encouraged them to pose for a picture.

Midwest AeroCare representative Angela Warner stood nearby and asked if she could post the picture on the company’s Facebook page.

After Glossip said yes, Warner began talking about the membership program emphasizing that “with Fort Scott losing its hospital … having a helicopter be able to fly in can mean the difference between living and dying for some people.”

Glossip agreed and asked for a membership brochure.

UVA Will Cut Back On Lawsuits Against Patients In Wake Of KHN Investigation

UVA Health System, which sues thousands of patients each year, seizing wages and home equity to collect on overdue medical bills, said Friday it would increase financial assistance, give bigger discounts to the uninsured and “reduce our reliance on the legal system.”

“This will have a huge impact on patients to the good,” Doug Lischke, the health system’s chief financial officer, said in an interview. The changes will “positively, drastically reduce the legal process” of lawsuits, garnishments and property liens.

“We believe this is much more generous than what we’re doing now.”

Lischke called the new policy “a first step” that could later include financial assistance beyond what was announced Friday. UVA also plans to ask the Virginia General Assembly to change a state law requiring state agencies, including health systems, to “aggressively collect” unpaid bills and charge 6% interest on the balance, he said.

But independent experts said the new UVA policy, which comes on the heels of a Kaiser Health News investigation detailing UVA’s aggressive collection practices, still leaves numerous patients exposed to lawsuits and crippling bills. KHN found that UVA sued patients more than 36,000 times over six years for more than $106 million, sending many families into bankruptcy. And it routinely billed uninsured patients for far more than what a typical insurance company would have paid.

By leaving family assets vulnerable and not fully discounting sticker-price charges, the new UVA guidelines remain “very tough on the poor and near-poor who have managed to amass anything of value that will help them with the daily costs of life,” said Sara Rosenbaum, a health policy professor at George Washington University.

The amended policy loosens qualifications for financial assistance, awarding aid to families with income of up to 400% of the federal poverty level, or $103,000 for a family of four. Until now, families making more than half that much were ineligible for assistance — the most restrictive rules of any major hospital system in Virginia, KHN found. Except in “unusual circumstances,” UVA won’t sue patients unless balances are more than $1,000 and families make more than 400% of the poverty guidelines, the health system said in a written statement.

“While these changes represent a step in the right direction, it’s unfortunate that UVA, a public institution, insists on still suing patients,” said Dr. Marty Makary, a surgeon and researcher at Johns Hopkins Medicine who studies hospital debt collection. “In my conversations with UVA surgeons, they are appalled by the practice of their center in suing patients and want it to stop.”

The changes take effect Jan. 1 but a UVA statement said the health system is “committed to working with anyone who currently has an outstanding balance or debt that they are struggling to pay.”

UVA has not decided what to do about patient lawsuits in the pipeline, Lischke said. Online court records show there are hearings scheduled for hundreds of UVA Medical Center cases over the next few weeks.

Mary Washington Healthcare of Fredericksburg, criticized earlier this summer for a far smaller number of lawsuits, said it would suspend suing patients and try to eliminate current garnishments. Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare in Memphis, another on a growing list of hospitals called out for aggressive collections, said it would suspend all court activity for a month.

UVA will apply the new financial assistance and charging policies to patients treated in July 2017 or later, Lischke said. That means patients on current payment plans or with judgments against them could have bills eliminated or adjusted. But there will be no refunds of payments already made, he said.

The policies also apply to patients treated after July 2017 with judgments against them but no payment plan, he said. But there will be no refunds of payments already made, he said.

Taken together the changes will cost UVA “millions to tens of millions,” he said declining to give a more precise figure.

UVA began revising its billing and collections policies after being informed of KHN’s findings in August. It examined policies of neighboring hospitals such as Mary Washington as well as other major academic medical centers, Lischke said.

Previously just $4,000 in a retirement account could bar UVA patients from financial help, no matter how low their income. Now patients can have at least $50,000 in savings beyond the value of their home and car and still get assistance as long as they meet the income test, UVA said.

The nonprofit health system, a taxpayer-supported state agency, also said it would grant discounts of 40% to the uninsured to better reflect lower rates negotiated and paid by insurance companies. Previously, uninsured patients got only 20% off the sticker price plus another 10% to 15% if they paid promptly, which few could.

Shaving 40% from “chargemaster” prices used as a starting point for insurer negotiations puts bills to the uninsured in line with what a commercial health plan would pay, Lischke said.

That’s not enough, Rosenbaum said. She recommended they be lowered further to Medicare levels, which can be 75% off or more.  The total of UVA’s cash revenue from all health plans and government programs is 70% below chargemaster, financial forms filed with the Department of Health and Human Services show.

“Even a 40% write-off of charges remains a brutal exposure” for the uninsured, she said. “How could they possibly remain tied to their chargemaster and keep a straight face?”

As part of its ongoing review of billing and collections, UVA will consider further lowering charges to the uninsured — perhaps to Medicare levels, Lischke said.

The new policy also does nothing for those who were sued and garnished for treatment before July 2017.

So far the health system’s announcement doesn’t help the 20 UVA students reported by KHN to have “active holds” on their enrollment this semester because they owe money to the UVA Medical Center. UVA treats unpaid hospital bills the same as unpaid tuition.

UVA has not approached legislators yet about changing billing laws but hoped to have next year’s General Assembly consider it.

“I am hopeful that we are able to influence a change to not only the Debt Collection Act” requiring aggressive collection “but also the state indigent care guidelines,” Lischke said.

Gov. Ralph Northam, a physician who is close to Dr. L.D. Britt, a Norfolk surgeon and professor who is chairman of the health system’s board, has said nothing publicly beyond his Monday statement that “I am glad to hear the UVA Health System is in the process of changing their policies and practices.”

Few Things So Starkly Set America’s Health System Apart As How Much Patients Have To Pay Out Of Pocket

Nearly all of America’s global competitors — whether they have government health plans, such as Britain and Canada, or rely on private insurers, such as Germany and the Netherlands — strictly limit out-of-pocket costs. In more news on the health industry and insurance: hospital lawsuits against low-income patients; employer-based health care costs; price hikes and upcoding; America’s uninsured rate; and state marketplaces.

As Opponents Predicted, ‘Right To Try’ Law Fizzles Without Drugmakers’ Buy-In

Drugmakers prefer to have their products go through the FDA approval process. “At the end of the day, [companies] control their products. It’s their property. You can pass a law saying people can try things, but unless you obligate companies to give something, there’s no right to gain access,” said Arthur Caplan, who heads the division of medical ethics at the NYU School of Medicine.

UVA Suspends Medical Lawsuits In Wake Of KHN Investigation

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Under pressure after Kaiser Health News reported Monday that it sues thousands of patients a year and sends many into bankruptcy, University of Virginia Health System suspended about a dozen patient lawsuits Thursday and said it will announce changes to its billing and collections policy Friday.

At a weekly session at the Albemarle County Courthouse often dominated by UVA hospital litigation, UVA lawyer Melissa Riley said cases due to be heard Thursday would be withdrawn while the system takes a broader look at its long-standing practice of aggressive debt collection.

The move affects only those cases and changes nothing for thousands of patients who have already lost court judgments to UVA or face other pending lawsuits. And those cases could be refiled later.

“The university is conducting a review and may announce changes to its policies tomorrow,” Riley said.

Several patients in the courtroom and District Court Judge William Barkley said they had no comment.

UVA sued more than 36,000 patients over six years for unpaid bills for more than $106 million, KHN found.

It also seized some $22 million in patients’ state tax refunds, mostly outside the judicial process, as part of a program to help state and local governments collect debts. And it frequently billed uninsured patients for far more than what a typical insurance company would have paid.

Top officials at the health system’s quarterly board meeting Thursday morning were set to discuss billing and collections in a closed session but had little to say about the matters beforehand.

“I’m very concerned” about what KHN reported “and I’m very sympathetic” to patients caught in litigation, said James Murray, a venture capitalist who as rector serves as the head of the UVA Board of Visitors, its governing body.

As usual, the board met in UVA’s classical Rotunda, designed by Thomas Jefferson. UVA is taxpayer- and state-funded. A KHN reporter objected to the closed session, arguing that matters potentially affecting hundreds of thousands of UVA patients should be discussed publicly.

“We’re not going to discuss it in open session,” said Pamela Sutton-Wallace, the UVA Medical Center CEO who will step down in November, the university disclosed Tuesday.

Instead the board, led by L.D. Britt, a surgeon and professor at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, celebrated a profitable fiscal year and UVA Medical Center ranking again as U.S. News & World Report’s top hospital in Virginia.

Unaudited results presented Thursday showed UVA Medical Center, the core of UVA Health, made an $87 million operating profit on revenue of $1.7 billion in the fiscal year ending in June and held stocks, bonds and other investments worth about $1 billion.

As part of its investigation into billing practices, KHN reported that UVA has the least generous patient financial assistance guidelines of any major hospital system in Virginia. Savings of only a few thousand dollars in a 401(k) account can disqualify even families with very low incomes from UVA aid.

CEO Sutton-Wallace is moving to New York-Presbyterian Hospital in November to become a senior vice president, UVA Health announced Tuesday. Her departure “is in no way related” to the billing and collections problems, UVA President James Ryan said in a message to employees.

New York-Presbyterian did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

Data editor Elizabeth Lucas contributed to this report. 

Congress Rakes In Millions From Drugmakers

Members of Congress raked in almost $4 million from pharmaceutical manufacturers and their trade groups in the first six months of 2019. Two members — Sen. Chris Coons (D-Del.) and Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) — each received over $100,000. Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.) is $5,000 shy of qualifying for the “million-dollar club,” a group of current members who’ve received $1 million or more since 2007.

The pharmaceutical industry has a long history of seeking to influence legislation by donating to the committees controlled by powerful members of Congress. As they return from recess and drug-pricing legislation comes into focus, find out how much your state’s representatives and senators took from the industry by examining KHN’s exclusive “Pharma Cash to Congress” feature.