I’m A CPAP Dropout: Why Many Lose Sleep Over Apnea Treatment

When doctors told Frances Faulkenburg she had sleep apnea, she was more than ready for relief from her tired-all-the-time existence. She used to fall asleep at red lights while behind the wheel. At night, she’d wake up gasping for air, heart pounding. Her husband told her she snored. But Faulkenburg, 47, couldn’t tolerate the CPAP …

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Listen: Opioid Trial In Oklahoma Wraps Up

Did drugmaker Johnson & Johnson create a “public nuisance” that led to the opioid epidemic? That’s the question a state judge in Oklahoma is weighing after the country’s first trial against opioid manufacturers wrapped up Monday. The state is asking for $17 billion in damages. Jackie Fortier of StateImpact Oklahoma has covered the trial from …

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A ‘No-Brainer’? Calls Grow For Medicare To Cover Anti-Rejection Drugs After Kidney Transplant

On Wednesday, Alexis Conell will mark seven years since she received the kidney transplant that saved her life, but the 53-year-old Chicago woman isn’t exactly celebrating. Although the federal government paid most of the costs for her 2012 transplant, a long-standing Medicare policy halted coverage three years later for the drugs that keep her body …

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‘An Arm And A Leg’: Journalist Learns The Hard Way That CPAP Compliance Pays

Can’t see the audio player? Click here to listen. About This Podcast Health care — and how much it costs — is scary. But you’re not alone with this stuff, and knowledge is power. “An Arm and a Leg” is a podcast about these issues, and its second season is co-produced by KHN. Visit armandalegshow.com When …

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Judge Slashes Roundup Weedkiller Verdict From $80 Million To $25 Million For California Man With Cancer

U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria in San Francisco said Monday the higher award was “constitutionally impermissible” because it was nearly 15 times the compensatory damages award. He denied Bayer’s request for a new trial. Edwin Hardeman used Roundup for many years starting in the 1980s to treat poison oak and weeds on his property. He …

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‘Technological Feat’ Of Research On Old Tissue From DNC Serves Up Evidence HIV Started Infecting Humans In Late 1800s

Scientists at the University of Arizona examined a tissue sample that dates back to the 1960s, the oldest sample of HIV to date, and concluded the virus jumped from primates earlier than expected. The researchers tested 1,652 pathology samples and found the HIV sequence in one. Public health news also looks at: CRISPR baby editing …

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Uptick In Wildfires, Flooding Contributing To A ‘Toxic Gumbo’ Of Chemicals In Survivors’ Daily Lives

The toxic substances displaced during disasters “are much more long-lasting and ubiquitous than I think people realize,” said Gina McCarthy, who ran the Environmental Protection Agency during the Obama administration. “And we clearly haven’t caught up in terms of our laws and regulations, and the process of disaster response.”

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How The Department Of Homeland Security Found Itself At The Heart Of Deep Moral Dilemmas

The New York Times takes a look inside the agency that so often is the face of President Donald Trump’s immigration strategy that has led to national outrage over how it is being implemented. Meanwhile, Border Patrol is investigating those involved with a secret Facebook group that included posts joking about migrant deaths. Other news …

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Health Leaders Worry About Unscrupulous Data Mongers Circling Like Sharks As Patient Records Are More Accessible

There are concerns from experts who say patients may not fully understand the privacy implications of new records apps and end up signing a lot of their information away without realizing it. Other news at the intersection of technology and health care: artificial intelligence and dental bills, telemedicine in rural areas, wireless health hazards and …

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‘Dope Refugees’ Flock To New York City’s Transit Hubs In Search Of A Better Life

Experts say the swelling number of users around the transit hubs is in part because they can find more tolerance and support in New York City than in their hometowns, as well as greater access to services such as syringe exchanges. Meanwhile, the country’s foster system is being strained beneath the weight of the drug …

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‘Cunning, Cynical And Deceitful’: Sparks Fly In Closing Arguments Of Closely Watched Johnson & Johnson Opioid Trial

The six-week trial was the first of many lawsuits against pharmaceutical companies over what role they played in the opioid epidemic, and the outcome is expected to set the bar for the ones that follow. The judge says he anticipates taking about a month to reach a decision in the case.

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