In The Event Of A Shutdown …

A government shutdown would have far-reaching effects for public health, including the nation’s response to the current, difficult flu season. It could also disrupt some federally supported health services, experts said Friday. In all, the Department of Health and Human Services would send home — or furlough — about half of its employees, or nearly …

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CrossFit Members Quit After Owner Posts Controversial Videos of Female Clients’ Butts

A North Carolina CrossFit owner took videos of several female members as they were bending over during their workouts. The owner of a North Carolina CrossFit gym is being criticized for posting videos of female members’ butts with sexually suggestive captions. Blue Ridge CrossFit owner Tom Tomlo took videos of several female members as they were bending …

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The Humble Ascent of Oat Milk

Advertisement When did finding something to put in your coffee get so complicated? For the lactose-intolerant or merely dairy-averse, there are more alternatives to good ol’ American cow’s milk than ever. First there were powdered “creamers,” with their troublesome corn syrup solids. Then came soy, which may come closest to the real thing in nutrients …

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Viewpoints: Reasons For Health Taxes On Soda; Weighing The Pros and Cons Of New Blood Pressure Guidelines

Opinion writers and medical experts from around the country express views on a number of health care issues. The New York Times: The Case For The Health TaxesThe politics of soda has changed pretty radically. Just a decade ago, virtually no countries or cities had a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages.Then Mexico enacted a substantial tax …

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Research Roundup: CHIP, Medicaid and High-Needs Patients

Here is a selection of news coverage of other recent research: The Commonwealth Fund: Integrating Health Social Services High-Need Patients We categorized cross-sector community partnerships in four dimensions. We also identified five common challenges: inadequate strategies to sustain cost-savings, improvement, and funding; lack of accurate and timely measurement of return on investment; lack of mechanisms to …

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State Highlights: Mass.’s Largest Insurers Dropped By State’s Group Health Insurance Commission; In Phoenix, Program Taps Taxis To Take 911 Calls

Media outlets report on news from Massachusetts, Arizona, Maryland, Ohio, Texas, Oregon, Louisiana and California. WBUR: Major Mass. Insurers Dropped From State Employee Health SystemA decision about health coverage for state employees and retirees is shaking the Massachusetts health insurance industry. Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Tufts Health Plan and Fallon Health, which are the second-, …

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N.H. Bill Introduced To Address School Nurse Shortage By Easing Certification Requirements

Meanwhile, in the news from other capitols around the country, the California Nurses Association stormed the state house Thursday to demonstrate in support of single-payer health care and Iowa’s senate approves a measure to lighten the penalty for first-time possession of small amounts of marijuana. Concord Monitor: Bill To Undo Requirements For School Nurses Introduced …

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A $500, Non-Invasive Blood Test Could Detect 8 Types Of Cancers — But It’s A Long Way Off

But scientists are excited about the possibilities offered by the test, which could offer a diagnosis even before symptoms start showing. Los Angeles Times: This New Blood Test Can Detect Early Signs Of 8 Kinds Of CancerScientists have developed a noninvasive blood test that can detect signs of eight types of cancer long before any …

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With Older Women Having Babies, Scientists See Glimmer Of Hope Amid Distressing Fertility Rates

The country’s fertility rates are at a record low, which has serious consequences for the U.S.’s future, but more women are now mothers due to people waiting until later in life to have babies. In other public health news: the brain and exercise, tobacco, ADHD drugs, medical research, liquid biopsies and more. The New York …

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The Facts Beneath The Hyperbole: Flu Strain Is Definitely Vicious But Not Uniquely Lethal Or New

The New York Times offers some answers about this season’s flu virus. Media outlets report on related news out of New York, Missouri, Kansas, California and Arizona, as well. The New York Times: Questions And Answers About This Year’s Flu SeasonAt the moment, the 2017-2018 flu season is considered “moderately severe.” Large numbers of Americans …

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Letter From Democratic Senators Warns That Work Requirements For Medicaid May Not Be Legal

The letter, drafted by Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said work requirements “contradict the plain text and purpose” of the Medicaid statute. In other Medicaid news, Colorado makes no progress on getting people with developmental disabilities off the waiting list for services, Rhode Island’s governor proposes cuts that includes a freeze in reimbursement rates for hospitals …

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Experts Applaud Hospitals’ Gumption In Producing Own Drugs, But Question If It Will Make A Difference

“While it is an intriguing business opportunity, it is not without risks since it isn’t cheap to become a manufacturer and generic competition is harsh,” says Scott Knoer, Cleveland Clinic’s chief pharmacy officer. Modern Healthcare: Health System-Led Drug Company Unlikely To Make A Dent In Drug Prices, Shortages As four not-for-profit health systems unveiled plans to …

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How Once ‘Pro-Choice’ Trump Has Given Anti-Abortion Movement Most Optimism In A Decade

President Donald Trump will on Friday become the first sitting president to address the March for Life activists, in a sign of how much he’s moved on the issue since becoming president. In his first year Trump secured major victories for the movement, including the latest in which his administration created a religious freedom division …

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The Bike That Saved My Life

Advertisement Two years ago, in January, my husband and I walked into a foreclosed house on a tree-lined street in Bedford-Stuyvesant that no one had lived in for 22 years. “I could really see us having kids here,” he whispered into my ear as we tiptoed over the detritus of squatters and failed contractors. For …

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Olympus Faces New Trial Over Medical Scopes Tied To Superbug Deaths

A Seattle judge said Olympus Corp. failed to properly disclose internal emails that raised safety concerns about a redesigned medical scope as early as 2008, several years before the device was publicly tied to deadly superbug outbreaks. Citing those “willful discovery violations” by the Japanese device giant, King County Superior Court Judge Steve Rosen ordered …

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It’s In The Mail: Aetna Agrees To $17M Payout In HIV Privacy Breach

This story is part of a partnership that includes WHYY, NPR and Kaiser Health News. This story can be republished for free (details). Aetna settled a lawsuit for $17 million Wednesday over a data breach that happened in the summer of 2017. The privacy of as many as 12,000 people insured by Aetna was compromised in a …

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