Statins May Have Cancer Benefits

Cholesterol-lowering statin drugs don’t just lower the risk of heart attacks. They may also help some cancer patients live longer. Researchers writing in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology tracked adherence to statins in more than 38,000 Australian women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, colorectal cancer or melanoma, three commonly diagnosed cancers. Average adherence to …

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Listen to Soundscapes from Home

Welcome. I wrote a few weeks ago about the sounds of pigeons undertaking their vigorous morning drills, their wings slapping against my windows. It’s easy, when we’re caught up in a day’s worth of doing and getting done, to ignore the soundtrack that’s always accompanying us, whether furnished by nature or by civilization. So many …

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Científicos advierten que se espera demasiado de una vacuna para COVID

SOBRE NOTICIAS EN ESPAÑOL Noticias en español es una sección de Kaiser Health News que contiene traducciones de artículos de gran interés para la comunidad hispanohablante, y contenido original enfocado en la población hispana que vive en los Estados Unidos. Use Nuestro Contenido Este contenido puede usarse de manera gratuita (detalles). La Casa Blanca y …

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For Each Critically Ill COVID Patient, a Family Is Suffering, Too

The weeks of fear and uncertainty that Pam and Paul Alexander suffered as their adult daughter struggled against COVID-19 etched itself into the very roots of their hair, leaving behind bald patches by the time she left the hospital in early May. Tisha Holt had been transferred by ambulance from a smaller hospital outside Nashville, …

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Readers and Tweeters Shed Light on Vaccine Trials and Bias in Health Care

Letters to the Editor is a periodic feature. We welcome all comments and will publish a selection. We edit for length and clarity and require full names. On the ‘Subject’ of Vaccine Trial Participants In the piece about the AstraZeneca vaccine trial subject who suffered severe spinal cord inflammation, that person was repeatedly referred to as a …

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Scientists Warn Americans Are Expecting Too Much From a Vaccine

This story also ran on NBC News. This story can be republished for free (details). The White House and many Americans have pinned their hopes for defeating the COVID-19 pandemic on a vaccine being developed at “warp speed.” But some scientific experts warn they’re all expecting too much, too soon. “Everyone thinks COVID-19 will go …

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As Anxieties Rise, Californians Buy Hundreds of Thousands More Guns

Use Our Content This story can be republished for free (details). Handgun sales in California have risen to unprecedented levels during the COVID-19 pandemic, and experts say first-time buyers are driving the trend. The FBI conducted 462,000 background checks related to handgun purchases in California from March through September, an increase of 209,000, or 83%, …

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Savvy Patient Fought for the Price She Was Quoted − And Didn’t Give Up

This story also ran on NPR. This story can be republished for free (details). When Tiffany Qiu heard how much her surgery was going to cost her, she was sure the hospital’s financial department had made a mistake. Qiu, who already knew from a breast cancer scare earlier that year that her plan required a …

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‘No Mercy’ Chapter 5: In Rural America, Cancer Care Is Often Far From Home

Can’t see the audio player? Click here to listen. Sixty-five-year-old Karen Endicott-Coyan is living with a blood cancer.  Her chemotherapy takes less than 30 minutes. Before the hospital closed, it was just a short drive into the small town of Fort Scott, Kansas, for her to get treatment. But these days getting to chemo means a …

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Telemedicine or In-Person Visit? Pros and Cons

About Asking Never Hurts A series of columns addressing the challenges consumers face in California’s health care landscape. Send questions to bwolfson@kff.org. As COVID-19 took hold in March, U.S. doctors limited in-person appointments — and many patients avoided them — for fear of infection. The result was a huge increase in the volume of remote medical …

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For People With Visual Impairments, Truly Secret Ballots Are Elusive

Norma Crosby remembers when she relied on blind faith to cast her vote. The 64-year-old Texan was born virtually without sight, a side effect of her mother catching rubella while pregnant with her. Friends and relatives stood beside her and filled out her ballot at polling precincts for more than half of her voting life. …

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If Trump Wins, Don’t Hold Your Breath Waiting for That ACA Replacement Plan

About HealthBent KHN’s chief Washington correspondent, Julie Rovner, who has covered health care for more than 30 years, offers insight and analysis of policies and politics in her regular HealthBent columns. Send questions to jrovner@kff.org. This story also ran on The BMJ. This story can be republished for free (details). If President Donald Trump wins reelection …

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Trick-or-Treating This Year? Here’s How

First, the official guidance: According to Dr. Tanya Altmann, a spokesperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics, “As long as your family is staying six feet apart from other families, you’re outdoors and you’re not touching commonly touched surfaces, it can be OK to go door-to-door in your neighborhood.” However, the C.D.C. has different guidelines. …

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Verily’s COVID Testing Program Halted in San Francisco and Oakland

OAKLAND, Calif. — Amid fanfare in March, California officials celebrated the launch of a multimillion-dollar contract with Verily — Google’s health-focused sister company — that they said would vastly expand COVID testing among the state’s impoverished and underserved communities. But seven months later, San Francisco and Alameda counties — two of the state’s most populous …

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